This site will look much better in a browser that supports web standards, but it is accessible to any browser or Internet device.

 
provenmodels offers
 
join our program
 

featured management models

disruptive innovation: Christensen, Clayton M.
 

disruptive innovation

Christensen, Clayton M.

  • topic: innovation & risk, strategic management and technology & operations
  • period: 1997
Christensen's disruptive innovation model, published in 1997, provides an explanation for the inability of well-managed, industry-leading companies to stay atop of their industry when confronted with new, ground breaking technological innovations. Clayton M. Christensen is an associate professor at Harvard Business School. His research...
 
five configurations: Mintzberg, Henry
 

five configurations

Mintzberg, Henry

  • topic: org. design & development
  • period: 1979
The Canadian academic, Henry Mintzberg, synthesised organisational design literature into five ideal organisational forms or configurations that do not exist in the real world, but provide consultants and managers a framework to understand and design organisational structures. Mintzberg defined organisational structure as "the sum...
 
ten managerial roles: Mintzberg, Henry
 

ten managerial roles

Mintzberg, Henry

  • topic: leadership & management and personnel management
  • period: 1973
The Canadian academic, Henry Mintzberg who had trained as a mechanical engineer, wrote his PhD thesis at the MIT Sloan School of Management analysing the actual work habits and time management of chief executive officers (CEOs). In 1973, Mintzberg's thesis on the nature of managerial work was adopted as a study and published for a wider audience. Mintzberg's...
 
five product levels: Kotler, Philip
 

five product levels

Kotler, Philip

  • topic: marketing & sales and technology & operations
  • period: 1969
In the 1960's, the economist Philip Kotler changed the perception of marketing. He described what marketing is rather than what marketers do, thereby changing marketing from a departmental specialisation into a corporate wide doctrine. For Kotler, marketing was a 'social process by which individuals and groups obtain what they need and want through creating...